Clattery MacHinery on Poetry

September 27, 2006

Poetry Festivals Worldwide: This weekend, the Dodge

Filed under: 21 century poetry, 21st century poets, Aldeburgh Poetry Festival, Austin International Poetry Festival, Beall Poetry Festival, Belfast Poetry Festival, Berkeley Poetry Festival, Burning Word Festival, by Bud Bloom, Carrboro Poetry Festival, Cork International Poetry Festival, Dancing Poetry Festival, Denver Poetry Festival, Edmonton Poetry Festival, Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival, Guardian Hay Festival, Hay Fringe Festival, International Poetry Festival of Medellín, Jerusalem Poetry Festival, John Milton Memorial Celebration of Poets and Poetry, Kwani? Lit Fest Blog, Ledbury Poetry Festival, Los Angeles Poetry Festival and Noir Corridor, Lowell Celebrates Kerouac!, Manchester Poetry Festival, Massachusetts Poetry Festival, MassPOP, Milton Poetry Fest, Newburyport Literary Festival, North Carolina Festival of the Book, Ojai Poetry Festival, One Square Meter, Overload Poetry Festival, Palm Beach Poetry Festival, poetry, Poetry Africa, Poetry Can, poetry festivals, Poetry Now Festival, poets, pop culture, Portland Library Poetry Festival, San Francisco Poetry Festival, Sarah Lawrence Festival, Saratoga Poetry Festival, Seacoast Poetry & Jazz Festival, Silverton Poetry Festival, Skagit River Poetry Project, Sparrows Poetry Festival, StAnza, Struga Poetry Evenings, Sunken Garden Poetry Festival, Terry Plunkett Maine Poetry Festival, The Chicago Poetry Fest, Trois-Rivières International Festival of Poetry, Tucson Poetry Festival, WA Spring Poetry Festival, Wisconsin Book Festival — Clattery MacHinery @ 2:11 am

   

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This Thursday, September 28th, the bi-annual Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival begins, and will last through Sunday afternoon. The organizers have planned a star-studded line-up of poets for 20,000 poetry fans, music, educational programs, food, the works, all for a bargain price of about $1 Million (to the foundation–tickets are less). It will be held at Waterloo Village in Byram Township in New Jersey.

(Edited/Updated from here for the 2008 festival)

Here is the page of performing poets:

Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival: Poets

Here is the weekend weather in Stanhope NJ:

Weather.com: Stanhope

And here is the web site of the foundation:

The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

   

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Poetry Festivals Worldwide

   

(The Hay)

   

Poetry festivals sponsored by good organizations take place around the world throughout the year, especially spring and fall. Below is a list of some of them. If you know any of them that are missing, please let me know.

   

   

                Aldeburgh Poetry Festival
                Austin International Poetry Festival
                Beall Poetry Festival
                Belfast Poetry Festival
                Berkeley Poetry Festival
                Burning Word Festival
                Carrboro Poetry Festival
                The Chicago Poetry Fest
                The Cork International Poetry Festival
                Dancing Poetry Festival
                Denver Poetry Festival
                Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival
                Edmonton Poetry Festival
                The Guardian Hay Festival
                Hay Fringe Festival
                The International Poetry Festival of Medellín
                Jerusalem Poetry Festival: One Square Meter
                Kwani? Lit Fest Blog
                Ledbury Poetry Festival
                Los Angeles Poetry Festival and Noir Corridor
                Lowell Celebrates Kerouac!
                Manchester Poetry Festival
                Massachusetts Poetry Festival
                John Milton Memorial Celebration of Poets and Poetry
                Newburyport Literary Festival
                North Carolina Festival of the Book
                Ojai Poetry Festival
                Overload Poetry Festival
                Palm Beach Poetry Festival
                Poetry Africa
                Poetry Can
                The Poetry Now Festival
                Portland Library Poetry Festival
                Rotterdam International Poetry Festival
                San Francisco Poetry Festival
                Sarah Lawrence Festival
                Saratoga Poetry Festival
                Seacoast Poetry & Jazz Festival
                Seattle Poetry Festival
                Silverton Poetry Festival
                Skagit River Poetry Project
                Sparrows Poetry Festival
                StAnza
                Struga Poetry Evenings
                Sunken Garden Poetry Festival
                Terry Plunkett Maine Poetry Festival
                Trois-Rivières International Festival of Poetry
                Tucson Poetry Festival
                WA Spring Poetry Festival
                Wisconsin Book Festival

   

(Overload)

   

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September 26, 2006

Punky Dunk and the Spotted Pup

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PUNKY DUNK AND
THE SPOTTED PUP

   

THIS LITTLE STORY IS TOLD
AND THE LITTLE PICTURES
WERE DRAWN FOR A GOOD
LITTLE CHILD NAMED
   

   

______________________________

   

Published in the Shop of
P.F. VOLLAND & CO.
CHICAGO

COPYRIGHT, 1912,
P. F. VOLLAND & CO.,
CHICAGO, U. S. A.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

   
   

Author Anonymous

   
   

_____

   


   

          Punky Dunk on a day in the middle of May
          Looked around like a wise little cat,
          And he said with surprise: “Can I trust my own eyes?
          Well, what do you know about that?”
   

_____

   


   

          For a wagon of blue, with a man in blue, too,
          At the sidewalk was just backing up.
          And the man brought a crate that was heavy of weight
          And inside was a gay spotted pup.
   

_____

   


   

          Now Punky felt hurt as he gazed very pert
          At the gay spotted pup in the box,
          For the pup was all white, save for spots black as night
          On his back and his tail, ears and sox.
   

_____

   


   

          “Meow!” said the cat, “That pup is too fat
          To run or to climb up a tree.
          The baby won’t like that gay spotted tike
          As well as I know he likes me.”
   

_____

   


   

          Punky said: “He may run, but he won’t be much fun,
          He may set, or may bark, or may point.”
          You see, Punky’s heart was beginning to smart
          And his nose was put clear out of joint.
   

_____

   


   

          The pup was let out, and he ran all about
          So happy was he to be free.
          Then Punky said: “Meow!” the dog said: “Bow-wow!”
          And Punky said: “Look out for me!”
   

_____

   


   

          He raised up his hair and tried hard to scare
          The pup, so he would run away,
          But the pup shook his head and in dog talk he said:
          “No, Punky, I’ve come here to stay.”
   

_____

   


   

          Then Punky, quite rash, at the pup made a dash,
          But the pup stood his ground very bold.
          And Punky then stopped so quick that he dropped
          And over and over he rolled.
   

_____

   


   

          Then the pup with a bark started in for a lark
          But Punky thought he meant to fight,
          And he ran up a tree just as fast as could be
          And he stayed there until it was night.
   

_____

   


   

          Punky Dunk has made up with the gay spotted pup
          And with Baby they play every day.
          Don’t you think, little friends, that this little tale ends
          In the very best kind of way?
   

_____

   

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with

almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or

re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included

with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

   

_____

   

September 24, 2006

Verse Libromancy updated: poetry (with love) from the Cosmos to you

Filed under: Uncategorized — Clattery MacHinery @ 11:17 pm

You can have a “Verse Libromancy” button at the top of your sidebar, like mine to the right. Each time you click it, you will be sent to any one of 554 sites that publish poetry. It’s like walking in a library, and a poetry periodical, selected by the Cosmos just for you, falls off the shelf to your feet.

I just removed 10 poetry sites that are no longer on the web, added 10 others (per chance only), and updated numerous URLs that changed.

Easy instructions on how to install a “Verse Libromancy” button onto your blog or web site, are posted at Bud Bloom Poetry, in the July 2nd entry here:

Verse Libromancy.

_____

The Babes in the Wood: a Randolph Caldecott Picture Book

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Printed in Great Britain

 

 

____________

 

author anonymous
 

THE BABES

IN THE WOOD

 

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________________________

 

The Babes in the Wood

 

003.jpg

 

                        Now ponder well, you parents deare,
                                    These wordes which I shall write;
                        A doleful story you shall heare,
                                    In time brought forth to light.

                        A gentleman of good account
                                    In Norfolke dwelt of late.
                        Who did in honour far surmount
                                    Most men of his estate.

                        Sore sicke he was, and like to dye,
                                    No helpe his life could save;
                        His wife by him as sicke did lye,
                                    And both possest one grave.
 

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                        No love between these two was lost,
                                    Each was to other kinde;
                        In love they liv’d, in love they dyed,
                                    And left two babes behinde:

                        The one a fine and pretty boy,
                                    Not passing three yeares olde;
                        The other a girl more young than he
                                    And fram’d in beautye’s molde.

                        The father left his little son,
                                    As plainlye doth appeare,
                        When he to perfect age should come
                                    Three hundred poundes a yeare.

                        And to his little daughter Jane
                                    Five hundred poundes in gold,
                        To be paid downe on marriage-day,
                                    Which might not be controll’d:
 

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                        But if the children chanced to dye,
                                    Ere they to age should come,
                        Their uncle should possesse their wealth;
                                    For so the wille did run.
 

babes006_0.jpg

 

                        “Now, brother,” said the dying man,
                                    “Look to my children deare;
                        Be good unto my boy and girl,
                                    No friendes else have they here:

                        “To God and you I do commend
                                    My children deare this daye;
                        But little while be sure we have
                                    Within this world to staye.

                        “You must be father and mother both,
                                    And uncle all in one;
                        God knowes what will become of them,
                                    When I am dead and gone.”
 

babes007.jpg

 

                        With that bespake their mother deare:
                                    “O brother kinde,” quoth shee,
                        You are the man must bring our babes
                                    To wealth or miserie:
 

babes008.jpg

babes009.jpg

 

                        “And if you keep them carefully,
                                    Then God will you reward;
                        But if you otherwise should deal,
                                    God will your deedes regard.”
 

babes010.jpg

 

                        With lippes as cold as any stone.
                                    They kist the children small:
                        ‘God bless you both, my children deare;’
                                    With that the teares did fall.
 

babes011.jpg

babes012.jpg

 

                        These speeches then their brother spake
                                    To this sicke couple there:
                        “The keeping of your little ones,
                                    Sweet sister, do not feare:

                        “God never prosper me nor mine,
                                    Nor aught else that I have,
                        If I do wrong your children deare,
                                    When you are layd in grave.”
 

babes013.jpg

babes014.jpg

 

                        The parents being dead and gone,
                                    The children home he takes,
                        And bringes them straite unto his house,
                                    Where much of them he makes.
 

babes015.jpg

babes016.jpg

 

                        He had not kept these pretty babes
                                    A twelvemonth and a daye,
                        But, for their wealth, he did devise
                                    To make them both awaye.

                        He bargain’d with two ruffians strong,
                                    Which were of furious mood,
                        That they should take the children young,
                                    And slaye them in a wood.
 

babes017.jpg

 

                        He told his wife an artful tale,
                                    He would the children send
                        To be brought up in faire London,
                                    With one that was his friend.
 

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                        Away then went those pretty babes,
                                    Rejoycing at that tide,
                        Rejoycing with a merry minde,
                                    They should on cock-horse ride.
 

babes019.jpg

babes020.jpg

 

                        They prate and prattle pleasantly
                                    As they rode on the waye,
                        To those that should their butchers be,
                                    And work their lives’ decaye:

                        So that the pretty speeche they had,
                                    Made murderers’ heart relent:
                        And they that undertooke the deed,
                                    Full sore did now repent.

                        Yet one of them, more hard of heart,
                                    Did vow to do his charge,
                        Because the wretch, that hired him,
                                    Had paid him very large.
 

babes021.jpg

 

                        The other would not agree thereto,
                                    So here they fell to strife;
                        With one another they did fight,
                                    About the children’s life:
 

babes022.jpg

 

                        And he that was of mildest mood,
                                    Did slaye the other there,
                        Within an unfrequented wood,
                                    Where babes did quake for feare!
 

babes023.jpg

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                        He took the children by the hand,
                                    While teares stood in their eye,
                        And bade them come and go with him,
                                    And look they did not crye:

                        And two long miles he ledd them on,
                                    While they for food complaine:
                        “Stay here,” quoth he, “I’ll bring ye bread,
                                    When I come back againe.”
 

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                        These prettye babes, with hand in hand,
                                    Went wandering up and downe;
 

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                        But never more they sawe the man
                        Approaching from the town.
 

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                        Their prettye lippes with blackberries
                                    Were all besmear’d and dyed;
                        And when they sawe the darksome night,
                                    They sat them downe and cryed.
 

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                        Thus wandered these two prettye babes,
                                    Till death did end their grief;
                        In one another’s armes they dyed,
                                    As babes wanting relief.

                        No burial these prettye babes
                                    Of any man receives,
 

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                        Till Robin-redbreast painfully
                                    Did cover them with leaves.
 

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________________________

 

 

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____________

 

 

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.            You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

 

 

____________

 

September 21, 2006

Green Grape Cakes

___________

 

tonguetwister.jpg

 

A compilation of the tongue twisters of verse, in alphabetical order.

 

___________

 

All I want is a proper cup of coffee
Made in a proper copper coffee pot.
You can believe it or not,
But I just want a cup of coffee
In a proper coffee pot.
Tin coffee pots
Or iron coffee pots
Are of no use to me.
If I can’t have
A proper cup of coffee
In a proper copper coffee pot,
I’ll have a cup of tea!
 

                        ________
 

Amidst the mists and coldest frosts,
with stoutest wrists and loudest boasts,
he thrusts his fist against the posts
and still insists he sees the ghosts.
 

                        ________
 

As he gobbled the cakes on his plate,
the greedy ape said as he ate,
the greener green grapes are,
the keener keen apes are
to gobble green grape cakes,
they’re great!

(from Dr. Seuss’s O Say Can You Say?)
 

                        ________
 

Betty Botter had some butter,
“But,” she said, “this butter’s bitter.
If I bake this bitter butter,
it would make my batter bitter.
But a bit of better butter
that would make my batter better.”

So she bought a bit of butter,
better than her bitter butter,
and she baked it in her batter,
and the batter was not bitter.
So ’twas better Betty Botter
bought a bit of better butter.
 

                        ________
 

Big black bugs bleed blue black blood
but baby black bugs bleed blue blood.
 

                        ________
 

A bitter biting bittern
Bit a better brother bittern,
And the bitter better bittern
Bit the bitter biter back.
And the bitter bittern, bitten,
By the better bitten bittern,
Said: “I’m a bitter biter bit, alack!”
 

                        ________
 

Bobby Bippy bought a bat.
Bobby Bippy bought a ball.
With his bat Bob banged the ball
Banged it bump against the wall
But so boldly Bobby banged it
That he burst his rubber ball
“”Boo!”” cried Bobby
Bad luck ball
Bad luck Bobby, bad luck ball
Now to drown his many troubles
Bobby Bippy’s blowing bubbles.

(from mid-Willamette Valley theater)
 

                        ________
 

The bottle of perfume that Willy sent
was highly displeasing to Millicent.
Her thanks were so cold
that they quarreled, I’m told
o’er that silly scent Willy sent Millicent.
 

                        ________
 

But a harder thing still to do.

What a to do to die today
At a quarter or two to two.
A terrible difficult thing to say
But a harder thing still to do.
The dragon will come at the beat of the drum
With a rat-a-tat-tat a-tat-tat a-tat-to
At a quarter or two to two today,
At a quarter or two to two.

(from a college drama class)
 

                        ________
 

Can you imagine an imaginary menagerie manager
imagining managing an imaginary menagerie?
 

                        ________
 

Come, come,
Stay calm, stay calm,
No need for alarm,
It only hums,
It doesn’t harm.
 

                        ________
 

Denise sees the fleece,
Denise sees the fleas.
At least Denise could sneeze
and feed and freeze the fleas.
 

                        ________
 

Did Dick Pickens prick his pinkie picking cheap cling peaches
in an inch of Pinch or framing his famed French finch photos?
 

                        ________
 

Dr. Johnson and Mr. Johnson, after great consideration,
came to the conclusion that the Indian nation beyond the Indian Ocean
is back in education because the chief occupation is cultivation.
 

                        ________
 

Federal Express is now called FedEx.
When I retire I’ll be a FedEx ex.
But if I’m an officer when I retire, I’ll be an ex Fedex Exec.
Then after a divorce, my ex-wife will be an ex FedEx exec’s ex.
If I rejoin FedEx in time, I’d be an ex ex FedEx exec.
When we remarry, my wife will be an ex ex FedEx exec’s ex.
 

                        ________
 

A flea and a fly flew up in a flue.
Said the flea, “Let us fly!”
Said the fly, “Let us flee!”
So they flew through a flaw in the flue.
 

                        ________
 

Fresh fried fish,
Fish fresh fried,
Fried fish fresh,
Fish fried fresh.
 

                        ________
 

Give me the gift of a grip-top sock,
A clip drape shipshape tip top sock.
Not your spinslick slapstick slipshod stock,
But a plastic, elastic grip-top sock.
None of your fantastic slack swap slop
From a slap dash flash cash haberdash shop.
Not a knick knack knitlock knockneed knickerbocker sock
With a mock-shot blob-mottled trick-ticker top clock.
Not a supersheet seersucker rucksack sock,
Not a spot-speckled frog-freckled cheap sheik’s sock
Off a hodge-podge moss-blotched scotch-botched block.
Nothing slipshod drip drop flip flop or glip glop
Tip me to a tip top grip top sock.

(articulation warmup for actors)
 

                        ________
 

How many berries could a bare berry carry,
if a bare berry could carry berries?
Well they can’t carry berries
(which could make you very wary)
but a bare berry carried is more scary!
 

                        ________
 

How many boards
Could the Mongols hoard
If the Mongol hoards got bored?

(from the comic Calvin & Hobbes, by Bill Waterson)
 

                        ________
 

How many cans can a cannibal nibble
if a cannibal can nibble cans?
As many cans as a cannibal can nibble
if a cannibal can nibble cans.
 

                        ________
 

How many cookies could a good cook cook
If a good cook could cook cookies?
A good cook could cook as much cookies
as a good cook who could cook cookies.
 

                        ________
 

How many sheets could a sheet slitter slit
if a sheet slitter could slit sheets?
 

                        ________
 

How much caramel can a canny canonball cram in a camel
if a canny canonball can cram caramel in a camel?
 

                        ________
 

How much dew does a dewdrop drop
If dewdrops do drop dew?
They do drop, they do
As do dewdrops drop
If dewdrops do drop dew.
 

                        ________
 

How much ground would a groundhog hog,
if a groundhog could hog ground?
A groundhog would hog all the ground he could hog,
if a groundhog could hog ground.
 

                        ________
 

How much myrtle would a wood turtle hurdle
if a wood turtle could hurdle myrtle?
A wood turtle would hurdle as much myrtle as a wood turtle could hurdle
if a wood turtle could hurdle myrtle.
 

                        ________
 

How much wood could Chuck Woods’ woodchuck chuck,
if Chuck Woods’ woodchuck could and would chuck wood?

If Chuck Woods’ woodchuck could and would chuck wood,
how much wood could and would Chuck Woods’ woodchuck chuck?

Chuck Woods’ woodchuck would chuck,
he would, as much as he could,
and chuck as much wood as any woodchuck would,
if a woodchuck could and would chuck wood.
 

                        ________
 

How much wood would a woodchuck chuck
if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
He would chuck, he would, as much as he could,
and chuck as much wood as a woodchuck would
if a woodchuck could chuck wood.
 

                        ________
 

I am not the pheasant plucker,
I’m the pheasant plucker’s mate.
I am only plucking pheasants
’cause the pheasant plucker’s running late.
 

                        ________
 

I cannot bear to see a bear
Bear down upon a hare.
When bare of hair he strips the hare,
Right there I cry, “Forbear!”
 

                        ________
 

If you stick a stock of liquor in your locker
it is slick to stick a lock upon your stock
or some joker who is slicker
is going to trick you of your liquor
if you fail to lock your liquor with a lock.
 

                        ________
 

I know a boy named Tate
who dined with his girl at eight eight.
I’m unable to state what Tate ate at eight eight
or what Tate’s tête à tête ate at eight eight.
 

                        ________
 

I need not your needles, they’re needless to me;
For kneading of noodles, ’twere needless, you see;
But did my neat knickers but need to be kneed,
I then should have need of your needles indeed.
 

                        ________
 

I saw a saw in Arkansas,
that would outsaw any saw I ever saw,
and if you got a saw
that will outsaw the saw I saw in Arkansas
let me see your saw.
 

                        ________
 

I saw Esau kissing Kate.
I saw Esau, he saw me,
and she saw I saw Esau.
 

                        ________
 

I saw Susie sitting in a shoe shine shop.
Where she sits she shines,
and where she shines she sits.
 

                        ________
 

I slit the sheet, the sheet I slit,
and on the slitted sheet I sit.
 

                        ________
 

I thought a thought.
But the thought I thought wasn’t the thought
I thought I thought.
 

                        ________
 

I wish to wish the wish you wish to wish,
but if you wish the wish the witch wishes,
I won’t wish the wish you wish to wish.
 

                        ________
 

I would if I could, and if I couldn’t, how could I?
You couldn’t, unless you could, could you?
 

                        ________
 

If a Hottentot taught a Hottentot tot
To talk ere the tot could totter,
Ought the Hottenton tot
Be taught to say aught, or naught,
Or what ought to be taught her?
If to hoot and to toot a Hottentot tot
Be taught by her Hottentot tutor,
Ought the tutor get hot
If the Hottentot tot
Hoot and toot at her Hottentot tutor?
 

                        ________
 

If Kantie can tie a tie and untie a tie,
why can’t I tie a tie and untie a tie like Kantie can.
 

                        ________
 

If one doctor doctors another doctor, does the doctor
who doctors the doctor doctor the doctor the way the
doctor he is doctoring doctors? Or does he doctor
the doctor the way the doctor who doctors doctors?
 

                        ________
 

If you can’t can any candy can,
how many candy cans can a candy canner can
if he can can candy cans?
 

                        ________
 

If you stick a stock of liquor in your locker,
It’s slick to stick a lock upon your stock,
Or some stickler who is slicker
Will stick you of your liquor
If you fail to lock your liquor
With a lock!
 

                        ________
 

I’m not the fig plucker,
Nor the fig plucker’s son,
but I’ll pluck your figs
till the fig plucker comes.
 

                        ________
 

It’s not the cough that carries you off,
it’s the coffin they carry you off in!
 

                        ________
 

Knife and a fork bottle and a cork
that is the way you spell New York.

Chicken in the car and the car can go,
that is the way you spell Chicago.
 

                        ________
 

A lady sees a pot-mender at work at his barrow in the street.

“Are you copper-bottoming them, my man?”
“No, I’m aluminuming ’em, Mum”
 

                        ________
 

The Leith police dismisseth us
They thought we sought to stay;
The Leith police dismisseth us
They thought we’d stay all day.
The Leith police dismisseth us,
We both sighed sighs apiece;
And the sighs that we sighed as we said goodbye
Were the size of the Leith police.
 

                        ________
 

Love’s a feeling you feel when you feel
you’re going to feel the feeling you’ve never felt before.
 

                        ________
 

Luke’s duck likes lakes.
Luke Luck licks lakes.
Luke’s duck licks lakes.
Duck takes licks in lakes Luke Luck likes.
Luke Luck takes licks in lakes duck likes.

(from Dr. Seuss’ Fox in Socks)
 

                        ________
 

Mares eat oats and does eat oats,
and little lambs eat ivy.
A Kid will eat ivy too, wouldn’t you?
 

                        ________
 

Mary Mac’s mother’s making Mary Mac marry me.
My mother’s making me marry Mary Mac.
Will I always be so Merry when Mary’s taking care of me?
Will I always be so merry when I marry Mary Mac?

(from a song by Carbon Leaf)
 

                        ________
 

Mo mi mo me send me a toe,
Me me mo mi get me a mole,
Mo mi mo me send me a toe,
Fe me mo mi get me a mole,
Mister kister feet so sweet,
Mister kister where will I eat !?
 

                        ________
 

Moses supposes his toeses are roses,
but Moses supposes erroneously.
For Moses, he knowses his toeses aren’t roses,
as Moses supposes his toeses to be.

(Donald O’Connor and Gene Kelly in “Singing in the rain”)
 

                        ________
 

Mr. See owned a saw.
And Mr. Soar owned a seesaw.
Now See’s saw sawed Soar’s seesaw
Before Soar saw See,
Which made Soar sore.
Had Soar seen See’s saw
Before See sawed Soar’s seesaw,
See’s saw would not have sawed
Soar’s seesaw.
So See’s saw sawed Soar’s seesaw.
But it was sad to see Soar so sore
Just because See’s saw sawed
Soar’s seesaw!
 

                        ________
 

My dame hath a lame tame crane,
My dame hath a crane that is lame.
 

                        ________
 

My Friend Gladys

Oh, the sadness of her sadness when she’s sad.
Oh, the gladness of her gladness when she’s glad.
But the sadness of her sadness,
and the gladness of her gladness,
Are nothing like her madness when she’s mad!
 

                        ________
 

Ned Nott was shot
and Sam Shott was not.
So it is better to be Shott
than Nott.
Some say Nott
was not shot.
But Shott says
he shot Nott.
Either the shot Shott shot at Nott
was not shot,
or
Nott was shot.
If the shot Shott shot shot Nott,
Nott was shot.
But if the shot Shott shot shot Shott,
then Shott was shot,
not Nott.
However,
the shot Shott shot shot not Shott
but Nott.
 

                        ________
 

Of all the felt I ever felt,
I never felt a piece of felt
which felt as fine as that felt felt,
when first I felt that felt hat’s felt.
 

                        ________
 

On mules we find two legs behind
and two we find before.
We stand behind before we find
what those behind be for.
 

                        ________
 

Once upon a barren moor
There dwelt a bear, also a boar.
The bear could not bear the boar.
The boar thought the bear a bore.
At last the bear could bear no more
Of that boar that bored him on the moor,
And so one morn he bored the boar
That boar will bore the bear no more.
 

                        ________
 

One smart fellow, he felt smart.
Two smart fellows, they felt smart.
Three smart fellows, they all felt smart.
 

                        ________
 

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
Did Peter Piper pick a peck of pickled peppers?
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
where’s the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?
 

                        ________
 

Pick a partner and practice passing,
for if you pass proficiently,
perhaps you’ll play professionally.
 

                        ________
 

Pretty Kitty Creighton had a cotton batten cat.
The cotton batten cat was bitten by a rat.
The kitten that was bitten had a button for an eye,
And biting off the button made the cotton batten fly.
 

                        ________
 

Ruby Rugby’s brother bought and brought her
back some rubber baby-buggy bumpers.
 

                        ________
 

Sarah saw a shot-silk sash shop full of shot-silk sashes
as the sunshine shone on the side of the shot-silk sash shop.
 

                        ________
 

Sarah sitting in her Chevrolet,
All she does is sits and shifts,
All she does is sits and shifts.
 

                        ________
 

Say this sharply, say this sweetly,
Say this shortly, say this softly.
Say this sixteen times in succession.
 

                        ________
 

The seething seas ceaseth
and twiceth the seething seas sufficeth us.
 

                        ________
 

She saw Sherif’s shoes on the sofa.
But was she so sure she saw Sherif’s shoes on the sofa?
 

                        ________
 

She sells sea shells by the sea shore.
The shells she sells are surely seashells.
So if she sells shells on the seashore,
I’m sure she sells seashore shells.
 

                        ________
 

She stood on the balcony
inexplicably mimicing him hiccupping,
and amicably welcoming him home.
 

                        ________
 

Silly Sally swiftly shooed seven silly sheep.
The seven silly sheep Silly Sally shooed
shilly-shallied south.
These sheep shouldn’t sleep in a shack;
sheep should sleep in a shed.
 

                        ________
 

Sister Suzie sewing shirts for soldiers
Such skill as sewing shirts
Our shy young sister Suzie shows
Some soldiers send epistles
Say they’d rather sleep in thistles
Than the saucy, soft short shirts for soldiers Sister Suzie sews.
 

                        ________
 

A skunk sat on a stump
and thunk the stump stunk,
but the stump thunk the skunk stunk.
 

                        ________
 

The Smothers brothers’ father’s mother’s brothers are
the Smothers brothers’ mother’s father’s other brothers.
 

                        ________
 

Suddenly swerving, seven small swans
Swam silently southward,
Seeing six swift sailboats
Sailing sedately seaward.
 

                        ________
 

“Surely Sylvia swims!” shrieked Sammy, surprised.
“Someone should show Sylvia some strokes so she shall not sink.”
 

                        ________
 

Susan shineth shoes and socks;
socks and shoes shines Susan.
She ceased shining shoes and socks,
for shoes and socks shock Susan.
 

                        ________
 

Swan swam over the sea,
Swim, swan, swim!
Swan swam back again
Well swum, swan!
 

                        ________
 

Theophiles Thistle, the successful thistle-sifter,
in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted thistles,
thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb.

Now, if Theophiles Thistle, the successful thistle-sifter,
in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted thistles,
thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb,
see that thou, in sifting a sieve full of un-sifted thistles,
thrust not three thousand thistles through the thick of thy thumb.

Success to the successful thistle-sifter!
 

                        ________
 

There once was a man who had a sister, his name was Mr. Fister. Mr. Fister’s sister sold sea shells by the sea shore. Mr. Fister didn’t sell sea shells, he sold silk sheets. Mr. Fister told his sister that he sold six silk sheets to six shieks. The sister of Mr. Fister said I sold six shells to six shieks too!
 

                        ________
 

There was a young fisher named Fischer
Who fished for a fish in a fissure.
The fish with a grin,
Pulled the fisherman in;
Now they’re fishing the fissure for Fischer.
 

                        ________
 

They have left the thriftshop,
and lost both their theatre tickets
and the volume of valuable licenses
and coupons for free theatrical frills and thrills.
 

                        ________
 

Three gray geese in the green grass grazing.
Gray were the geese and green was the grass.
 

                        ________
 

Through three cheese trees three free fleas flew.
While these fleas flew, freezy breeze blew.
Freezy breeze made these three trees freeze.
Freezy trees made these trees’ cheese freeze.
That’s what made these three free fleas sneeze.

(from Fox in Sox by Dr. Seuss)
 

                        ________
 

A tidy tiger tied a tie tighter to tidy her tiny tail
On two thousand acres, too tangled for tilling,
Where thousands of thorn trees grew thrifty and thrilling,
Theophilus Twistle, less thrifty than some,
Thrust three thousand thistles through the thick of his thumb!
 

                        ________
 

To begin to toboggan first, buy a toboggan.
But do not buy too big a toboggan!
Too big a toboggan is too big a toboggan
to buy to begin to toboggan.
 

                        ________
 

A tree toad loved a she-toad
Who lived up in a tree.
He was a two-toed tree toad
But a three-toed toad was she.
The two-toed tree toad tried to win
The three-toed she-toad’s heart,
For the two-toed tree toad loved the ground
That the three-toed tree toad trod.
But the two-toed tree toad tried in vain.
He couldn’t please her whim.
From her tree toad bower
With her three-toed power
The she-toad vetoed him.
 

                        ________
 

A Tudor who tooted a flute
tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to their tutor,
“Is it harder to toot
or to tutor two tooters to toot?”
 

                        ________
 

A twister of twists once twisted a twist;
A twist that he twisted was a three-twisted twist;
If in twisting a twist one twist should untwist,
The untwisted twist would untwist the twist.
 

                        ________
 

What a shame such a shapely sash
should such shabby stitches show.
 

                        ________
 

When a twister a-twisting will twist him a twist,
For the twisting of his twist, he three twines doth intwist;
But if one of the twines of the twist do untwist,
The twine that untwisteth untwisteth the twist.

Untwirling the twine that untwisteth between,
He twirls, with his twister, the two in a twine;
Then twice having twisted the twines of the twine,
He twitcheth the twice he had twined in twain.

The twain that in twining before in the twine,
As twines were intwisted he now doth untwine;
Twist the twain inter-twisting a twine more between,
He, twirling his twister, makes a twist of the twine.
 

                        ________
 

When does the wristwatch strap shop shut?
Does the wristwatch strap shop shut soon?
Which wristwatch straps are Swiss wristwatch straps?
 

                        ________
 

Whether the weather be fine
or whether the weather be not.
Whether the weather be cold
or whether the weather be hot.
We’ll weather the weather
whether we like it or not.
 

                        ________
 

Why do you cry, Willy?
Why do you cry?
Why, Willy?
Why, Willy?
Why, Willy? Why?
 

                        ________
 

Wun-wun was a racehorse.
Tu-tu was one, too.
When Wun-wun won one race,
Tu-tu won one, too.
 

                        ________
 

Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Spread it thick, say it quick!
Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Spread it thicker, say it quicker!
Yellow butter, purple jelly, red jam, black bread.
Don’t eat with your mouth full!
 

                        ________
 

You know New York.
You need New York.
You know you need unique New York.
 

                        ________
 

You’ve no need to light a night-light
On a light night like tonight,
For a night-light’s light’s a slight light,
And tonight’s a night that’s light.
When a night’s light, like tonight’s light,
It is really not quite right
To light night-lights with their slight lights
On a light night like tonight.
 

___________

 

Thanks to:

The Tongue Twister Data Base
www.uebersetzung.at
Ralph’s Tongue Twisters
 

___________

 

twistedtongue.jpg

 

___________

 

September 19, 2006

By what act or department of Congress?

_____

 

Below is the news release dated today from the Poetry Foundation here:

Foundation Announcements
 

_______________

 

September 18, 2006
Media Contact: Anne Halsey (312) 799.8016; ahalsey at poetryfoundation dot org
 

Poetry Foundation to Name First Children’s Poet Laureate

$25,000 lifetime achievement award honors poetry written for children

 

CHICAGO–The Poetry Foundation will inaugurate the nation’s first Children’s Poet Laureate: Consultant in Children’s Poetry to the Poetry Foundation, as part of the third annual Pegasus Awards ceremony in Chicago on September 27, 2006.

The Children’s Poet Laureate award will be given to a living American writer in recognition of a career devoted to writing exceptional poetry for the young child. The award aims to raise the general public’s awareness that children have a natural receptivity to poetry written specifically for them which, when nurtured, can grow into a lifelong love for poetry.

“Children’s poetry is an underrecognized branch of the poetry world that is largely unknown to writers and readers of poetry for adults,” said John Barr, president of the Poetry Foundation. “With the Children’s Poet Laureate award, the Poetry Foundation acknowledges the importance of children’s poetry in the larger world of poetry.”

The Children’s Poet Laureate will advise the Poetry Foundation on matters relating to children’s literature and may engage in projects to help instill a love of poetry among the youngest readers. The winner will receive the Children’s Poet Laureate Medallion, which includes the inscription “Permit a child to join,” taken from an Emily Dickinson poem. The length of the laureate’s tenure is two years and includes a prize of $25,000. The Children’s Poet Laureate will also give two major readings for children and their families, teachers, librarians, and friends over the course of the two-year tenure.

Once considered a venue from which to look nostalgically on childhood, children’s poetry today has become an art form for illuminating the immediate world of the young. Today’s poets are capturing children’s sensibilities and experience. Generously illustrated and written with craft and wit, poetry composed for children is reaching the best-seller lists of youth literature.

The appointment of the nation’s first Children’s Poet Laureate will be made by the Poetry Foundation with the help of an anonymous panel of judges. The recipient of the award will be announced during the Pegasus Awards ceremony in Chicago on September 27, 2006. No applications are accepted.
 

******

 

About the Pegasus Awards

The Poetry Foundation believes that targeted prizes can help recognize underappreciated accomplishments and diversify the kinds of poetry being written as well as widen the audience for the art form. With this in mind, the Poetry Foundation has established a family of prizes with an emphasis on underrecognized poets and types of poetry. Inaugurated in 2004, the Pegasus Awards honor achievements not already acknowledged by other poetry prizes.
 

******

 

About the Poetry Foundation

The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine and one of the largest literary organizations in the world, exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. The Poetry Foundation seeks to be a leader in shaping a receptive climate for poetry by developing new audiences, creating new avenues for delivery, and encouraging new kinds of poetry through innovative literary prizes and programs. For more information, please visit http://www.PoetryFoundation.org.
 

******

 

Download PDF
 

_____

September 16, 2006

Billy Collins: An Evening with the former U.S. Poet Laureate

________

 

Below is the original post made at Bud Bloom poetry, when it was possible to link to Billy Collins’ evening at UC Santa Barbara on September 15, 2003. In its stead, click on his picture to go to the Online Newshour show of Elizabeth Farnsworth’s December 10, 2001 interview of Billy Collins, in which he discusses poetry and reads two of them, “Introduction to Poetry” and “Design“.
 

billy-collins-2002-at-poetry-180.jpg

 

Also, click on this photo collage to go to a site of Billy Collins action poetry, where you will find his poetry readings set to animation.
 

billy-collins-action-poetry-collage.jpg

 

And you can click on the photo of his book “The Best Cigarette” to download it for free in its entirety.
 

billy-collins-the-best-cigarette.jpg

 

________

 

Original post below.
 

_____________

 

[Now-unavailable video was here.]

Voices

UC Santa Barbara Arts & Lectures

presents

Billy Collins

United States Poet Laureate, 2001-2003

 

“U.S. Poet Laureate Billy Collins delights a UCSB audience with his poetry which he sees as a ‘form of travel writing’ with humor as ‘a door into the serious.’ It is a door that many thousands of readers have opened with amazement and delight.”
 

________

 

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