Clattery MacHinery on Poetry

July 8, 2006

The House that Jack Built: One of R. Caldecott’s Picture Books

Filed under: Uncategorized — Clattery MacHinery @ 12:52 am


From the Randolph Caldecott entry of Wikipedia:

In 1877 Edmund Evans, who was a colour printer and talented engraver, lost the services of Walter Crane as his children’s book illustrator and asked Caldecott to do illustrations for two books for Christmas. The results were The House that Jack Built and The Diverting History of John Gilpin, published in 1878. They were an immediate success; so much so that he produced two more each year until he died.

____________________________

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

One of R. Caldecott’s Picture Books

FREDERICK WARNE & CO. Ltd.

1878

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT

This is the House that Jack built.



This is the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.


This is the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.



This is the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that Jack built.


This is the Cow with the crumpled horn,
  That tossed the Dog,
  That worried the Cat,
  That killed the Rat,
  That ate the Malt,
  That lay in the House that
            Jack built.


This is the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
            that Jack built.

This is the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with
        the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
        that Jack built.


This is the Priest, all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,

That milked the Cow with
    the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that
            Jack built.

This is the Cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the Priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,

That milked the Cow with
    the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House that
            Jack built.


This is the Farmer who sowed the corn,
That fed the Cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the Priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,

That tossed the Dog,
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt,
That lay in the House
      that Jack built.


2 Comments »

  1. Dear Bud,

    I hope you will be happy to hear that there is at least one librarian gathering close a small group of kindergarteners each year and reading this very book–the idea being to introduce progressive narrative, repetition in poetry, and illustration, while advancing their vocabularies. Believe me, sowed, crumpled, shorn and forlorn are new words to them.

    Great stuff, still.

    Carol

    Comment by Carolhttp://www.saba.blogs.com — July 10, 2006 @ 5:47 pm

  2. Hi Carol,

    Thanks for stopping by. And yes, I am very happy to hear this.

    There’s a lot in this little book, like you say. And it doesn’t take long for important life stories to unfold into memories, to go from a new house, to a lived-in one. And all the ecology and cycles of life too.

    Librarians like you are very important.

    Bud

    Comment by Bud Bloom — July 11, 2006 @ 3:45 am


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